Jumping to Orcas and WPF

6/22/2007 9:58:25 AM

Jumping to Orcas and WPF

After releasing the first version of my product, I would most likely jump directly to using Orcas and WPF targeting 3.0, at which point I will begin blogging about my experiences and the new feature set. I firmly believe in moving to the latest released languages and technologies as soon as possible. I don’t want to invest in moribund technologies, and I do want the most productive tools as I have limited resources.

I wonder how practical it is for me to move to the Orcas beta right now. There will be probably be a number of problems that I encounter, but will it be more than made up by the expanded feature set of Visual Studio or will there be show-stoppers? Is compiler and IDE performance going to take a hit as it did in Whidbey? Both productivity tools, Resharper 3.0 and Refactor Pro/CodeRush, already support Orcas.

For now, I will play it safe and jump into Orcas after I released NStatic. Every change seems to drag my release ever farther away.

As for WPF, I halted my user interface development work in anticipation for WPF, since it would obsolete some of my existing work and also includes support for animations, 3D, and a declarative programming model. My 3D effects library that I spent some time developing, including perspective warping for images, will probably go to waste.

My plan is to switch over to WPF as the primary programming model and utilize its WinForms compatibility controls. I will purchase the WPF editions of the existing control library as there are already many WPF-based user interface components available now. I purchased Chris Sells and Chris Anderson’s books on WPF; I will probably also buy Adam Nathan’s based on Jeff Atwood’s recommendation. The WPF programming model is just so clean and beautiful, a sharp contrast from MFC.

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SoftPerson develops innovative new desktop software applications by incorporating artificial intelligence and natural language technologies to bring human-like intelligence to everyday applications.

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